According to Adam in the article “Court’s split is a win for unions,” the failure of the Supreme Court to make a concrete final decision in regard to the public unions collecting fees from workers who are not their members was a great achievement for these unions. The public unions achieved in their fight because the non-member would eventually pay for the bargaining activities because they also benefited from the bargaining power from these unions (Adam, 2016).  Given the case received equal support and disprove from equal judges from the supreme court, it showed the importance of having an odd number of judges in the supreme court in order to have a fair judgment. Basically, the death of Justice Antonin Scalia is a great disappoint for the Supreme Court judgment. The work illustrates the impact of even number of judges in the courts while making critical decisions.

The win for the public union meant that the workers who failed to pay for the services did it illegally and were most likely to face the full face of law. Nevertheless, the decision was challenged as many workers believed that the decision should be termed fair if made when the court is on it full strength. Despite the decision, it was clear that it was illegal to force the workers to join unions without their will (Adam, 2016). The death of the judge had already balance of power in many cases including this one in particular. In appropriate number of members of justice in the Supreme Court had led to deadlock of many cases within the court.

In conclusion, despite the fact that the unions had a genuine argument in regard to all workers paying for the bargaining services as they benefited from the unions negotiations in terms of better salaries and wages, the judgment in the case was made illegal due to inappropriate members of the jury in the court (Adam, 2016). As the deadlock decision wait to be solved after the divided court, the non-members of the public unions were entitled to continue paying the suggested fees.

Reference

Adam, L. (2016). Court’s split is a win for unions: Houston Chronicle editorial. New York Times.