How to Measure Motivation

How to Measure Motivation

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Behavioral measure of motivation is an effective approach to measuring motivation. Motivation is evident in actions. Therefore, by looking at the behaviors or actions of employees, we can tell their motivation levels. In this approach, three measures would be used including speed, performance, and choice (Touré-Tillery & Fishbach, 2014). The first factor to consider is the amount of time employees put in pursuit of the set goal. A higher speed is an indicator of higher levels of motivation.

The second factor would be performance. The focus would be on measuring the level of performance. Here, there would be three measures to consider. The first measure is accuracy.  Employees with higher levels of motivation are more likely to execute their tasks accurately. The second factor to consider is the amount of work done (Touré-Tillery & Fishbach, 2014). Highly motivated employees are more likely to do more work.

The third factor is persistence. Highly motivated employees are more likely to spend more in pursuit of their goals. The third measure is the choice. This describes the act of selecting between courses of action (Touré-Tillery & Fishbach, 2014). Through this measure, we can tell on which side the motivation of an employee lies. The motivation will be stronger for the task chosen.

The motivation measuring approach would be effective in an attempt to enhance employee motivation for improved performance. For success, I would focus on measuring motivation at the individual level (Artelt, 2005). This way, it would be possible to identify any issues with individual employees and prevent them from affecting their performance.  I would know if this approach is valid and reliable in two ways. First, I would check to ensure that there is evidence to support the application of the approach. Second, it would be valid and reliable if the next motivation measuring activity would show improvements in motivational levels.

References

Artelt, C. (2005). Cross-cultural approaches to measuring motivation. Educational     Assessment, 10(3), 231–255.

Touré-Tillery, M. & Fishbach, A. (2014). How to Measure Motivation: A Guide for the   Experimental Social Psychologist. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 8/7,      328–341.

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Student’s name

Institutional Affiliation

Behavioral measure of motivation is an effective approach to measuring motivation. Motivation is evident in actions. Therefore, by looking at the behaviors or actions of employees, we can tell their motivation levels. In this approach, three measures would be used including speed, performance, and choice (Touré-Tillery & Fishbach, 2014). The first factor to consider is the amount of time employees put in pursuit of the set goal. A higher speed is an indicator of higher levels of motivation.

The second factor would be performance. The focus would be on measuring the level of performance. Here, there would be three measures to consider. The first measure is accuracy.  Employees with higher levels of motivation are more likely to execute their tasks accurately. The second factor to consider is the amount of work done (Touré-Tillery & Fishbach, 2014). Highly motivated employees are more likely to do more work.

The third factor is persistence. Highly motivated employees are more likely to spend more in pursuit of their goals. The third measure is the choice. This describes the act of selecting between courses of action (Touré-Tillery & Fishbach, 2014). Through this measure, we can tell on which side the motivation of an employee lies. The motivation will be stronger for the task chosen.

The motivation measuring approach would be effective in an attempt to enhance employee motivation for improved performance. For success, I would focus on measuring motivation at the individual level (Artelt, 2005). This way, it would be possible to identify any issues with individual employees and prevent them from affecting their performance.  I would know if this approach is valid and reliable in two ways. First, I would check to ensure that there is evidence to support the application of the approach. Second, it would be valid and reliable if the next motivation measuring activity would show improvements in motivational levels.

References

Artelt, C. (2005). Cross-cultural approaches to measuring motivation. Educational     Assessment, 10(3), 231–255.

Touré-Tillery, M. & Fishbach, A. (2014). How to Measure Motivation: A Guide for the   Experimental Social Psychologist. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 8/7,      328–341.

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